Holiday Recipe – Halloween – Dragon’s Blood Soup

Dragon’s are large, serpent-like creatures found around the world, co-existing alongside and sometimes terrorising various communities. In the East, they are wingless and four-legged, but known for their intelligence. In the West, however, they are known for being winged and being able to breathe fire as well. From Asia to Scandinavia, these creatures are both respected and highly feared. However, some chosen warriors may choose to slay one such beast which is terrorising their community and use it to create a hearty dish.

Whilst we recommend using all parts of the dragon in a dish (The scales usually require roughly 48-72 hours of slow cooking to make palatable, so you may choose to use them in crafts instead), this soup makes particular use of the blood. Try and use fresh dragon’s blood in the soup: It gives a much better, spicier flavour.

(Okay, so this soup is actually Beetroot and Bramley Soup! It’s a hearty, earthy dish which is fantastic for those colder nights. Accompanied with sour cream and dill sprigs, it’s a wonderfully unique flavour that dwarfs more run-of-the-mill soups like cream of chicken and mushroom. No dragon’s were harmed in the making of this dish!)

Ingredients
65 grams of Butter
2 Onions, chopped
2 Carrots, chopped
2 Celery Sticks, chopped
6 Garlic Cloves, chopped
1 Small Bramley Apple
800 grams of Beetroot, trimmed and sliced (No need to peel) or pre-cooked vacuum packed.
1.5 litres of Chicken Stock, hot

Method

  1. Melt the butter in a large, heavy-based pan over a low heat. Add the onions, carrots, celery, garlic and a splash of water. Cover and sweat for 15 minutes. Stir occasionally, until the onions are soft.
  2. Peel, core and slice the apple before adding it to the pan alongside the beetroot. Cover and sweat for a further 15 minutes.
  3. Pour in the stock, season and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer,  uncovered, for one hour until the beetroot is tender. If using pre-cooked beetroot, reduce the cooking time accordingly.
  4. Cool slightly, then puree with a hand-held blender, or in batches with a food processor, until smooth. Season and set aside to cool until just warm.
  5. Divide the soup between bowls, season and top with dollops of soured cream and fresh dill sprigs.